Saturday, January 14, 2012

Western writer inspiration, no. 20

Here is this week's omnibus of #westernwriter inspirations posted each day at twitter [click to enlarge]. If you are on twitter, you can follow me @rdscheer.

Indians at NW Mounted Police barracks, Regina, Saskatchewan, 1885
Navajo hogan and cornfield near Holbrook, Arizona, c1880
First and Last Chance Bar, California, 1885
Mounted Police barracks, Calgary, Alberta, 1889
Building under construction, Fort Keogh, Montana, c1889
Library, University of Colorado, Boulder, 1889
Indian burying ground, near Yale, British Columbia, 1887

Picture credits: Wikimedia Commons

Coming up:
Clint Eastwood, Pale Rider (1985)

11 comments:

  1. the library pic is so interesting. Today we have so many books so readily available. In those days they were so precious.

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    1. Charles, as a library lover, this photo really spoke to me, too.

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  2. I have always loved the area around Fort Keogh/Miles City: big and open and little changed from a hundred years ago to a thousand. Great pictures as always. I feel inspired.

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    1. Mark, I've spent time in that part of Montana, too, including the Miles City Bucking Horse Sale. Was sad when I had to leave.

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  4. That house under construction doesn't have much head room. Another nice selection of pics.

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  5. These are great pictures, especially the First and Last Chance Bar. On enlarging the photograph I saw the "Oakland Brewery" signboards on either side of the saloon door. I have, only vaguely, heard of Oakland being famous for beer though I know nothing about its history. I'm also curious about the picture of the Indians at the police barracks in Saskatchewan, Canada. In the context of American-Indian wars, which raged through the better part of the 19th century, how unusual is that photograph?

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    1. Prashant, not very unusual. It seems to have been a practice to photograph captured Indians, though I don't believe that's the case in this photo.

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    2. Thanks, Ron! It certainly doesn't look like a picture of captured Indians on display like some prized trophy. This one seems more like a photo-op. In a related context, the Indian police even now pose with crooks and criminals apprehended for crimes they may or may not have committed. I find it distasteful.

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